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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

1 edition of Studies on Roman pottery of the provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena (Tunisia) found in the catalog.

Studies on Roman pottery of the provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena (Tunisia)

J. H. Humphrey

Studies on Roman pottery of the provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena (Tunisia)

homage à Michel Bonifay

by J. H. Humphrey

  • 358 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Journal of Roman Archaeology in Portsmouth, R.I .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Roman Antiquities,
  • Roman Pottery,
  • Antiquities

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementedited by J.H. Humphrey ; with contributions by P. Bes ... [et al.].
    SeriesJournal of Roman archaeology. Supplementary series -- no. 76, Journal of Roman archaeology -- no. 76.
    ContributionsBonifay, Michel
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsNK3850 .S78 2009
    The Physical Object
    Pagination156 p. :
    Number of Pages156
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24834200M
    ISBN 101887829768
    ISBN 109781887829762
    LC Control Number2011380058
    OCLC/WorldCa547568526

    African red slip ware, also African Red Slip or ARS, is a category of terra sigillata, or "fine" Ancient Roman pottery produced from the mid-1st century AD into the 7th century in the province of Africa Proconsularis, specifically that part roughly coinciding with the modern country of Tunisia and the Diocletianic provinces of Byzacena and is distinguished by a thick-orange red.   This book examines how Romans used their pottery and the implications of these practices on the archaeological record. It is organized around a flow model for the life cycle of Roman pottery that includes a set of eight distinct practices: manufacture, distribution, prime use, reuse, maintenance, recycling, discard, s: 3.

    Abitina G2 Abthugni G2 Africa Proconsularis F2-H2 Ammaedara G3 Asadi H2 Assuras G3 Bagai F3 Belalis Maior G2 Bennafa H3 Bulla Regia G2 Byzacena . At its greatest extent, the empire ruled by Rome reached around the Mediterranean Sea and stretched from northern England to Nubia, from the Atlantic to Mesopotamia. Roman rule united this vast and varied territory, and Roman administration integrated it economically and socially. A traveler making a tour of the several provinces around A.D. (when citizenship was extended to all free-born.

      In this study, we integrate osteometric and palaeogenetic data to investigate dog variability in the Roman Empire in Iberia and North Africa. Osteometry was used to distinguish the status—domestic or wild, of approximately years old Canis remains and to understand to what extent teeth and long bones varied in dogs in the Roman provinces of Mauretania Tingitana, . (). Pottery in the Roman World: An Ethnoarchaeological Approach. By D. P. S. Peacock. Archaeological Journal: Vol. , No. 1, pp.


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Studies on Roman pottery of the provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena (Tunisia) by J. H. Humphrey Download PDF EPUB FB2

Studies on Roman pottery of the provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena (Tunisia): homage à Michel Bonifay. Studies on Roman pottery of the provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena (Tunisia): homage à Michael Bonifay edited by J.H.

Humphrey. Portsmouth, Rhode Island: Journal of Roman Archaeology, © Roman Africa (provinces of Tripolitana, Byzacena and Africa Proconsularis). His study mainly covers the times of the Roman Empire (chapter 7 deals with the collapse of Roman culture and the educational system at the times of the Vandals and during the Byzantine empire).

In: Humphrey, J. (ed.) Studies on Roman pottery of the provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena (Tunisia). Hommage à Michel Bonifay. Journal of Roman Archaeology. Supplementary series (76). Journal of Roman archaeology, Portsmouth, Rhode Island, pp. ISBN Full text not archived in this repository.

This book examines how Romans used their pottery and the implications of these practices on the archaeological record. It is organized around a flow model for the life cycle of Roman pottery that includes a set of eight distinct practices: manufacture, distribution, prime use, reuse, maintenance, recycling, discard, by: In: J.

Humphrey (ed.), Studies on Roman Pottery of the Provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena (Tunisia). Hommage à Michel Bonifay. Journal of Roman Archaeology, Suppl. Series 76 (Portsmouth ) | Michael Mackensen - is a platform for academics to share research papers.

-H umphrey, = J. Humphrey (ed.), Studies on the Roman Pottery of the Provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena (Tunisia). JRA Suppl. Ser. Portsmouth, Africa Proconsularis was a Roman province on the northern African coast that was established in BC following the defeat of Carthage in the Third Punic War.

It roughly comprised the territory of present-day Tunisia, the northeast of Algeria, and the coast of western Libya along the Gulf of Sirte. On the frontiers the work of the emperors in the second century continued that of the Flavians. The unimportance of Africa as a military theatre in this period is shown by the fact that the standing army for the whole of the Maghreb never contained more than one legion, the Third Augustan Legion, which moved its base from the older part of Proconsularis to that part called Numidia.

In: Humphrey, J. (ed.) Studies on Roman pottery of the provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena (Tunisia). Hommage à Michel Bonifay. Hommage à Michel Bonifay. Journal of Roman. The principal aim of the book was to examine the complex sequence of transition in the selected provinces of Zeugitana, Byzacena and Tripolitana of late Roman North Africa.

The general analysis (based on historical sources, epigraphy and archaeological evidence) focuses on transitions in town and country and economy from Roman to Vandal and to.

In recent years a strong case has been made for identifying intensive economic growth in the provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Numidia—notably, between the second and fourth centuries AD.¹ This thesis is supported by comparative studies of other preindustrial societies,² since Roman Africa reveals virtually all the classic elements.

The Romanization of Africa Proconsularis Issue 5 of Johns Hopkins University studies in historical and political science: Extra volumes: Author: Thomas Robert Shannon Broughton: Edition: 2, reprint: Publisher: Greenwood Press, Original from: the University of Michigan: Digitized: Length: pages: Export Citation: BiBTeX.

"This book examines the complex transition of North Africa from the Late Roman period to the Arab conquest, focusing on three provinces: Zeugitana, Byzacena and Tripolitana.

In particular, it 5/5(1). Evaluating Economic Growth in the Roman Province of Africa Proconsularis. By Matthew Simon Hobson. Download PDF (8 MB) Abstract. This study attempts to evaluate the social implications of economic changes that occurred in Roman North Africa between the fall of Carthage in BC and the arrival of the Vandals in the mid-5th century AD.

Pottery was produced in enormous quantities in ancient Rome, mostly for utilitarian is found all over the former Roman Empire and beyond. Monte Testaccio is a huge waste mound in Rome made almost entirely of broken amphorae used for transporting and storing liquids and other products – in this case probably mostly Spanish olive oil, which was landed nearby, and was the main fuel.

Romanization of Africa Proconsularis. Baltimore, The Johns Hopkins Press, (OCoLC) Online version: Broughton, T. Robert S. (Thomas Robert Shannon), Romanization of Africa Proconsularis.

Baltimore, The Johns Hopkins Press, (OCoLC) Material Type: Thesis/dissertation: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors. Moore, J.P. “Naked Bull-Riding on Ceramic Products from Roman Africa”, in Africa Romana: I luoghi e le forme dei mestieri e della produzione nelle province africane, Atti del XVIII convegno di studio, Olbia, dicembreeds.

Milanese, P. Ruggeri, and C. Vismara (Rome: Carocci editore), Moore, J.P. $ (4 used & new offers) Studies on Roman Pottery of the Provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena Tunisia (JOURNAL OF ROMAN ARCHAEOLOGY SUPPLEMENTARY SERIES) by J.

Humphrey | Jan 5, Africa, in ancient Roman history, the first North African territory of Rome, at times roughly corresponding to modern Tunisia. It was acquired in bc after the destruction of Carthage at the end of the Third Punic War. Initially, the province comprised the territory that had been subject to.

The province of Africa (Cartago and Libyan coast) was created then. Later, Julius Caesar annexed eastern Numidia (46 BCE) and created a new province – Africa Nova –, different from the older province of Africa (Africa Vetus). In 27 BCE, all of the conquered territory was merged into one province: Africa Proconsularis.Author of Literacy in the Roman World, The Roman and Byzantine Near East, and Studies on Roman Pottery of the Provinces of Africa Proconsularis and Byzacena (Tunisia)1/5(1).

During the 2nd century A.D., Roman war veterans were granted land in Northern Africa as a sign of gratitude from the politicians.

This arid climate proved beneficial in .